Sunday, 29 November 2015

St Denys in 1983

ST DENYS






433


434


(All 28.10.1983  Copyright Steve Sainsbury/Rail Thing)



One of my favourite spiots for rail photography was St Dents, between Southampton and Eastleigh. It was always a busy spot and before electrification of the Portsmouth line had plenty of old school diesel workings, plus anything could appear on the main line! The station also had nice classic buildings and a layout that allowed you to catch anything coming through just by loitering at the end of the up main line platform!

Back in 1983 the Wessex units were still a good way off, and of course class 33 hauled trains with five mark one coaches were commonplace.

More info (from Wiipedia)

St Denys railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
St Denys National Rail
StDenysStation-Platforms.jpg
St Denys station platforms
Location
PlaceSt. Denys
Local authorityCity of Southampton
Coordinates50.9220°N 1.3880°WCoordinates50.9220°N 1.3880°W
Grid referenceSU431138
Operations
Station codeSDN
Managed bySouth West Trains
Number of platforms4
DfT categoryE

Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05 0.190 million
2005/06Increase 0.195 million
2006/07Increase 0.202 million
2007/08Increase 0.207 million
2008/09Increase 0.219 million
2009/10Decrease 0.214 million
2010/11Increase 0.235 million
2011/12Increase 0.247 million
2012/13Increase 0.263 million
2013/14Increase 0.289 million
History
Original companyLondon and South Western Railway
Pre-groupingLondon and South Western Railway
Post-groupingSouthern Railway
1 May 1861First station opened asPortswood
5 March 1866Station relocated
1 January 1876Renamed St Denys
National Rail – UK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at from St Denys.

St Denys railway station serves the St. Denys and Portswood suburbs of Southampton in Hampshire, England.
Built in 1865, the station is named after the surrounding area, which in turn is named after the Priory of St Denys, a major landmark in medieval Southampton.
Services run hourly to Portsmouth & Southsea and Southampton. These are run by Class 450s. Also, there are hourly services between Salisbury and Romsey, run by Class 158s.
The station is at the site of the junction between the London to Weymouth mainline and the West Coastway Line running between Southampton and Portsmouth. It is currently served mainly by South West Trains, with irregular services operated by Southern. There are four platforms; two on the main line and two on the branch line.

History


St Denys station building (now in private ownership)
The original station was opened by the London and South Western Railway on 1 May 1861 and named Portswood after the small village to the west of the main line. Shortly after, to accommodate the Portsmouth branch line, a new station building was built 0.25 miles (0.40 km) to the south; the relocated station was opened on 5 March 1866. However to avoid confusion with Portsmouth, the station was renamed to St Denys on 1 January 1876.
The station buildings themselves are fine examples of Victorian architecture. The original station building on platform 1 is listed, although it is now privately owned. Platforms 2 and 3 house the waiting room and ticket window, whilst the old station buildings on platform 4 house The Solent Model Railway Group, a local organisation.

Accidents and incidents

  • In August 1939, a train overran signals and was derailed by trap points. The accident caused a set of points to move, diverting an approaching boat train. This averted a more serious accident, as wreckage was foul of the route the boat train should have taken.
  • On 14 August 1940, a passenger train was derailed due to enemy action. A bomb fell on the line ahead of the train, which was unable to stop in time.
  • On 29 October 1959, a passenger train overran signals and was derailed by trap points.
  • On 12 December 1960, a passenger train overran signals and was derailed. Two people were injured.



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